Web Talk Radio - Interview on Exercise and Cancer

A couple of years ago, I had the opportunity to do an interview with web talk radio on one of my favorite subjects - Exercise and Cancer.  In this interview, I discuss the relevant issues that make exercise the best type of integrative therapy for patient survivorship.  If you have time - take a listen.  I think you will find some great information "nuggets" that could help your wellness practice. 

http://webtalkradio.net/Shows/EatExerciseLive/052311.mp3

The Use of Exercise and Diet in the Remission of Type 2 Diabetes

In a four-year-long study, overweight and obese diabetics placed on a calorie-restrictive diet along with nearly three hours of exercise per week fared much better than controls.  After one year, 11.5 percent of the program participants no longer needed medication to keep their blood sugar levels below the diabetes threshold. Only two percent of the non-intervention group experienced any significant improvement in their condition.

The Need for Wellness and Prevention

This weekend I had the occasion to look at a 4 minute video clip on Upworthy.com relating to our health care system.  It was sad to say the least.  With over $2 trillion spent on basically disease management with no end in site to the rise in illness and chronic disease, it gets me (and others) to wonder when this madness will stop.

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The Ex Phys Chronicles - Putting Science into Todays Exercise Programs.

One of the virtues of being in my profession for so long is that I can compare the things happening today with their origins.

Today we are seeing a glut of exercise routines such as P90 X and HITT and Cross Fit Games and people think that they’re new and innovative.  Most instructors, and EVERY student who partakes in these programs really have no idea of how they came about.  

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The Use of Exercise and Diet in the Remission of Type 2 Diabetes

In a four-year-long study, overweight and obese diabetics placed on a calorie-restrictive diet along with nearly three hours of exercise per week fared much better than controls.  After one year, 11.5 percent of the program participants no longer needed medication to keep their blood sugar levels below the diabetes threshold. Only two percent of the non-intervention group experienced any significant improvement in their condition

Read More